New followers, I’m doing a 2017 Reading Challenge. At the beginning of every month, I’ll post a few books that fit the month’s theme and, at the end, I’ll give my thoughts on at least one of them. Interested in participating? It’s easy! Click here for my 2017 themes + January’s choices. See below for my thoughts on two of this month’s books. At any point during the year, read along with me, share your thoughts on the books I list — or any other. The only thing that matters is that you KEEP READING! 😀


Jill Archer, 2017 Reading ChallengeThe Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend

Book lover Sara travels from Sweden to a small town in Iowa to meet her pen pal, Amy, but when she arrives, she finds out that Amy has passed on. Having planned to stay a while, Sara isn’t sure what to do, so she temporarily moves into Amy’s house (the improbable plot point somehow works) and then opens a bookstore with Amy’s massive collection of books. She spends the next month pairing people and books, while the town tries to pair her with its most eligible bachelor. It’s a cute, whimsical story that sacrifices credibility for sentimentality.

The town of Broken Wheel kind of reminded me of Gilmore Girls‘  Stars Hollow or Pigeon Creek (the town that Melanie Carmichael/Smooter is from in Sweet Home Alabama), which is why I started thinking about what this book might look like if Reese Witherspoon bought the film rights. For fun, here’s my casting:

Caroline: Reese Witherspoon

Jen: Jennifer Garner

Tom: Jake Gyllenhaal

Sara: some unknown Swedish actress because both Noomi Rapace and Alicia Vikander seem too intense for the role. Sara’s not a bookish character that becomes a badass. She stays sweet.

Have you read The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend? What did you think?

Are you from Iowa? What did you think of Bivald’s depiction of Broken Wheel?

Jill Archer, 2017 Reading ChallengeThe Bookshop on the Corner

English urbanite librarian Nina loses her job due to staff cuts. Unsure of what her next move should be, she makes a spontaneous decision to buy an old truck and move to Scotland. She makes arrangements with a train conductor (another improbable plot point; they seem more glaring outside of fantasy) to have her vast book collection sent north and she proceeds to turn the old truck into a mobile bookshop (the title was misleading; there’s no bookshop on the corner… Nina’s truck is her only transportation and she drives it everywhere).

Although different in its own way, it felt similar to The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend. They were both cozy stories for book lovers who like sweet romances. I don’t mind cozy stories or sweet romances, but after two I was ready for something stronger. (I chose Amanda Bouchet’s A Promise of Fire and was not disappointed. If I have time, I’ll do a full post on it later.)

Have you read The Bookshop on the Corner? What did you think?

Do you like books about books? Which ones would you recommend?


Tomorrow, I’ll post February’s book choices. Until then, happy reading!